Dr. Daliya Tsamriyon Hallak

Dr. Daliya Tsamriyon Hallak

Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.

Psalms 34:14

Dr. Daliya Tsamriyon Hallak holds three Law degrees from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She published two books on “Proof of Paternity,” and one book on “Bribery Offense,” as well as various articles. Her doctoral dissertation was written about Ranking the Offence of Bribery with Regard to the Protected Interest. Her books have been quoted in Supreme Court rulings; and with regards to proof of paternity, even impacted various trends and legislature throughout the years. Up until recently, she was mainly engaged in the field of criminal law, as an advocate and manager in key positions in the Ministry of Justice: first as an attorney at the Haifa District Attorney, going on to establishing the South District Public Defense, serving as its head between 1998-2013, after which she went on willing retirement, feeling that she exhausting her potential, and choosing to focus on academic teaching and educating the next generation. As part of her work as the District Public Defender (apart from managing the district, which quickly became the largest in Israel), Dr. Tsamriyon took great part in the training, guidance and education of a new generation of hundreds of advocates, providing early training to some of the judges currently serving in Israeli courts, who began their careers through working with her, as young advocates or even as interns. Simultaneously, Dr. Tsamriyon has taught various criminal law subjects in College of Law & Business in Ramat-Gan, Sapir College, and is currently on her third years of teaching in Peres Academic Center. She was and remains a member of various professional, public, and cultural forums, committees, and organizations, a fierce activist for reducing the status given to confessions in Israeli courts, volunteer legal counsel of OMETZ movement (south district), organizes symposiums and professional education days, and lectures about criminal law and family law.

Areas of study: Criminal law